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New York's GLBT Cycling Club

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  • Lee Gorman Award

    In Memory of Lee Gorman

    Lee Gorman Award Established
    An award commemorating the life and contributions of Lee Gorman, cyclist and ride leader for Fast and Fabulous, was established by the board of Front Runners New York on Dec. 3, 2007.
 
The award is known as the Lee Gorman Memorial Cyclist of the Year. Katherine Timon, Lee’s surviving partner, contributed $1000 to fund the annual award, which consists of a statuette and a $50 gift certificate to a local bike store. “Lee loved cycling and she loved Fast and Fab,” Kat said. “This award is a wonderful tribute to her memory and I hope it will inspire other cyclists to find the same passion and joy in cycling that Lee found.” 

Lee Gorman, who led rides for Fast and Fab for more than 10 years, died July 13, 2007 at St. Luke’s Hospital in Manhattan. “She was passionate about bicycling, played a big role in both Front Runners and Fast and Fab, was keen on safety, welcoming to new cyclists and had one heck of a sense of humor,” said Michael Benjamin, president of Front Runners in 2007.
 
Before 2007, the only award given to a cyclist in Front Runners or Fast and Fab had been the Cyclist of the Year, which carried no endowment and thus offered no monetary reward. Fast and Fabulous has continued the tradition of the Lee Gorman Award since its separation from Front Runners in 2009.
 
Anyone may contribute to the fund by writing a check to “Fast and Fabulous,” noting Lee Gorman Fund in the memo or cover note and mailing it to Philip Greenwald, Fast and Fabulous Treasurer, 101 West 81st Street, Apt 718, NY NY 10024
 
Lee Gorman Award winners have been:
 2007 — Fritz Van Orden; 
2008 — Larry Boes; 
2009 — Bob Nelson; 2010 — Phil Greenwald.

    Lee Gorman, 1955-2007 
 
    Lee  Gorman, partner of Katherine Timon, ride leader for Fast and Fabulous and a generous, outgoing, effervescent soul if ever there was one, died of unknown causes at St. Luke’s Hospital in Manhattan early on the morning of July 13, 2007.  She was 51 years old and was buried at Wellwood Cemetery in West Babylon, N.Y., following a graveside ceremony.
    On July 22, a dozen cyclists from Fast and Fabulous and Century Road Club Association rode in Lee’s memory to Pier 45 at the foot of Christopher Street.  They brought five dozen roses and told stories about Lee while they removed the flower petals and placed them in a blanket.  After a moment of silence, they threw the petals in the Hudson River for Lee, a bright spot in a dark river.  “Bicycling gave her so much pleasure,” Kat said.  “It’s great that she found Fast and Fab and was able to do the rides she loved so much.”
    On the afternoon of July 12th, Lee visited her internist for treatment of severe head, jaw and leg pain.  After a series of tests proved inconclusive, Lee was sent home to await further results.  Later in the day her situation worsened and her close friend and riding partner, John Chapman, took her to the emergency room at St. Luke’s.  Physicians were again unable to diagnose any pathology, but admitted her and treated her pain and nausea.  When John left her at 11 p.m., she felt better and was looking forward to working her late shift as a New York City bus driver the following day.  At 3 a.m., medical staff at the hospital contacted Kat to tell her that Lee had had a cardiac event at 2:30 a.m. and could not be revived.
    Lee grew up in Marine Park with six brothers and sisters. In 2004 ago she moved to Manhattan to live with Kat on East 56th St.  Over the years, Lee worked a variety of jobs, including a position selling high-end shearling coats in the garment district.  During this time, she rode her bicycle round trip from Marine Park every day, all year round, quickly becoming a dedicated cyclist.
    Lee took a prominent role in Fast and Fabulous, then a committee of Front Runners New York.  She organized a rally to welcome two lesbian grandmothers who had bicycled from San Francisco to New York to promote marriage equality.  On July 10, 2004, about 70 Front Runners, cyclists and friends welcomed the couple to a run, bike ride and rally at Pier 45 at the foot of Christopher Street.  Television stations covering the event included New York 1, WNBC, WABC and WNYW (Fox).  WBGO-FM, the NPR affiliate in Newark, aired an interview with the women.
    She led many rides for Fast and Fab, was a member of Front Runners New York and frequent Lesbian and Gay Pride Run volunteer.  She was named Female Cyclist of the Year at the Front Runners Awards Dinner on Jan. 31, 2004.  With Paulette Meggoe, she marshaled the Saturday morning road bike races for Century Road Club Association, which held a moment of silence for her before the July 14th race.  Lee was one of only 15 cyclists, of about 80 starters, to finish the 2002 Boston to Provincetown Ride in a howling nor’easter.  (Paulette was one of the others.)
    Friends who wish to make a donation in Lee’s memory should go to the Recycle-a-Bicycle website at http://www.recycleabicycle.org/donate2006 .   Recycle-a-Bicycle buys helmets for kids at $20 each, and Lee tried to make sure that everyone on her rides wore a helmet.  John Chapman wrote on July 14:  “Just last week Lee was in a bike shop when a fashionably-dressed young woman was buying a fancy bicycle.  The woman didn’t like the high-end seat it came with and had decided to buy an even higher-end one.  Lee asked her if she could have the old one and the woman said, ‘Sure!’  Lee hopped on her bike and went right over to Recycle-a-Bicycle and presented it to them.  And then she biked off to her job.  That’s how she was.”

    Paulette
    IT WAS FRIDAY, JULY 13TH (A YEAR AGO THIS SUNDAY) THAT I OPENED AN EMAIL THAT READ “A FRIEND NO LONGER WITH US.” MY MIND
BEGAN TO RACE WITH THOUGHTS OF WHO COULD THIS BE?? NEVER EVER THINKING OF A YOUNG AND SPRITELY PERSON…IT MUST BE
ONE OF OUR OLDER FOLKS. HOW WRONG I WAS!!!!….MY MOUTH DROPPED OPENED AND STAYED THAT WAY FOR A MINUTE OR TWO.
FIRST SHOCK, THEN BEWILDERMENT AND THEN CURIOSITY AT WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN THE CAUSE OF SUCH DEVASTING NEWS?
EVENTUALLY, I WAS ABLE TO JUMP ON THE TELEPHONE AND MAKE SOME CALLS TO ASCERTAIN THE FACTS.

I MISS LEE ALWAYS BECAUSE SHE WAS A DEAR FRIEND AND ALWAYS A HELPFUL HAND WHENEVER AND WHEREVER NEEDED.
SHE DID NOT WAIT TO BE ASKED TO LEND A HAND….. SHE ALWAYS KNEW WHEN TO GIVE A HAND!!!!
A TRUE LOVER AND ENTHUSIAST FOR THE SPORT OF CYCLING, SHE LIVED FOR WEEKEND RACES WITH CRCA IN CENTRAL PARK.
WHETHER SHE WORKED THE DAY SHIFT OR THE NIGHT SHIFT AT HER REGULAR JOB, BE SURE SHE’LL BE OUT AT 5AM IN THE PARK
FOR THE RACES.

THE BOATHOUSE PARKING LOT EXIT AT THE BOTTOM OF CAT’S PAW HILL IS NOT THE SAME AND WILL NEVER BE THE SAME WITH
LEE GONE FROM US. MARSHALLS AND RACERS ALIKE MISSES HER RESOUNDING ENCOURAGEMENTS TO CLIMB THAT HILL, OR
HOW MANY SECONDS THE BREAKAWAY HAD ON THE PELETON (EVEN IF SHE WAS A LITTLE OFF WITH THE TIME). SHE KNEW
RACERS BY NAME AND WOULD GIVE PERSONAL CONGRATULATIONS ON THEIR FINISHES.

I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE THE “MARSHALL COUNT” FROM LEE….USE ANYBODY AND EVERY BODY THAT WAS AVAILABLE!!!…
IF YOU WERE JUST STANDING AROUND, SPECTATING OR WAITING FOR YOUR FRIEND TO FINISH THE RACE YOU AUTOMATICALLY
BECAME A MARSHALL. LEE WOULD DON A VEST ON YOU AND PLACE A WHISLTE IN YOUR HAND BECAUSE THE RACE MUST GO
ON.

I KNOW THAT THERE IS NO RACING IN THE PARK THIS WEEKEND….BUT AS FELLOW CYCLISTS, RACERS AND NON-RACERS ALIKE…
I ASK ONE FAVOR OF YOU FOR LEE……LET US ALL WITH ONE HEART, MIND, BODY AND SOUL ACKNOWLEDGE HER MEMORY THIS
WEEKEND WHEN YOU RIDE…BE IT INSIDE OR OUTSIDE OF THE PARK…. 

PEACE, LOVE & BLESSINGS

    Sondra Spencer and Mary McCauley
    I just wanted to share how sad Mary and I were to learn of the passing of Lee Gorman, as shared to us at the annual Boston to Provincetown ride brunch yesterday. We would only see her that one weekend a year, but we both so looked forward to seeing both she and fellow Fast and Fab member Paulette every year. I think the first time we really got to know her was on the ferry back to Boston, I believe in 2002, after that drenching and windy ride down. Riding the ferry back, Lee and Paulette mentioned that they had a car parked somewhere nearer the ride start. Our van was in a lot near the ferry landing, so we loaded all 4 bikes in and the four of us set off in search of the lot. Double parked during Boston rush hour, we unloaded the bikes and shared quick hugs and goodbyes until next year. How sad we both are to know that there will be no more hugs or flashes of that amazing smile. Our thoughts and prayers are with her partner, family and friends. Sondra Spencer and Mary McCauley, Middletown RI (Boston to Ptown riders 220 and 30).

    Karenlee Gorman
    I thought I would send an email, My prayers go out to her extended family and her Partner, Kat.

Although I met Lee in person once at the Boston to Ptown ride, she was a delight – we exchanged a few emails thinking we might be related in some way. She was a delight to meet, her smile and enthusiasm has always touched my heart. I was in and am still in shock; please know that I am thinking of you all. 

Maybe, some day, I can hook up with your group out of New York – 

A cycling enthuseiast from Maine

    Leon Moser
    I regret that I didn’t know Lee better as I’m finding out too late just how special a person she was. I was only just slightly acquainted with Lee through racing with and being on the board of CRCA.
    I recall the first time I caught her attention, one morning before a race, while she was getting things set up. I was both attracted to and, as a life-long New Yorker, wary of her strong personality.
    Over the years of racing while she was involved with the club, I took her enthusiastic cheering for granted and made it fodder for jokes with other racers, as we killed time waiting for the sprint finish.
    It was only a couple of weeks ago that I was touched to realize that Lee knew me by name as she cheered me personally with one lap to go.
    It was very inspiring (in spirit, at least) at the time, and it gave me comfort and more inspiration at our last race after hearing the terrible news of her passing.
    Personal reminisces aside, it deserves mention that she gave CRCA so much. It’s hard to find people willing to get up that early, let alone who are as reliable and effective as Lee was. I noticed that she seemed to always have the same people working with her. Anyone who can inspire that kind of loyalty at 5:30 on a Saturday morning has something special. And she inspired more than loyalty since, despite her absence, the event went off as smoothly as ever, except that it really wasn’t the same with her long-time marshaling spot being as quiet as it was.

    Fritz Van Orden
    I only met Lee once, at a small Fast N Fab dinner about six weeks before she died.  In the course of a two-hour meal, she took over my life and solved every problem I told her about.  She told me how to train for climbing hills.  She told me the best lighting to use when riding at night.  She told me how to handle my fundraising for the Braking the Cycle Ride.  She left her mark on me and I will feel her influence for a long time to come.
    The next time I see her I’ll ask her for advice on my love life…

    Lisa Wylie
    Whenever I think of Lee, I see her wonderful smile, feel her strong hugs, and hear her kind and loving words of compassion or advice.   Lee was someone I could call when I was down and someone who I would often share my victories with.
    She was an amazing woman who was always looking for ways to help others – family, friends, fellow cyclists, potential cyclists, and strangers.
    Lee is one of the precious gifts I received in my 6 years of living in NY… Her generosity, wit, and energy were endless…  She will always be one of my true friends. I miss you Lee!!  My only regret is that I never got to ride on your NYC bus!

    Gerry Oxford
    Bob suspects that Lee used her wiles to get them comped tickets coming home from New Hope. I’m sure it’s true, since I witnessed her, on the outgoing leg of that ride, shamelessly exploit her babe charms to get our whole group onto a no-bikes Path train. She thrust out her chest, shook her blond locks, and launched her 100-watt smile at the innocent attendant, who was blinded just long enough for the guys to jump on board, five Clark Gables to her Claudette Colbert. I was dazzled by her that weekend: she was frank, friendly, energetic, gorgeous, and an amazing rider.
    And then there was the Fast’n’Fab annual meeting when Lee decided that I should do the Boston-P’town ride. But I was a biking neophyte then, and couldn’t imagine doing 127 miles in a single day. “Sure you can!”, quoth Lee, “after all, it’s completely flat!”
    This was a lie.
    But thanks to her I did it (and did it again, and again, and again).
    That ride will never, ever, be flat. But without Lee it will be immensely, sadly, flatter.

    Merryl Kafka
    The shock and disbelief is more convincing that the reality. Lee was a very unique person who was loved by all who met her. So we will all carry a bit of her in each of us. A wasn’t going to pick up a moderately heavy box today, but thinking of Lee and her strength and “can do attitude”, I did it!
I suppose we never met via any circles of Lee’s friends. Stay strong and best regards.

    Varin Ayala
    I’m shocked and saddened by Lee Gorman’s death. She was such a doting, beautiful, energized (and energizing) person. I didn’t know her super well, but do remember going to a Memorial Day party with Sid Daniels (all lesbians… SId and I were the only boys and the girls LOVED us) at Lee’s apartment. This was Memorial Day of 2003, and the apartment was far – Brooklyn maybe? or Queens?. All I remember is you had to take the subway and then change to a bus and it took forever. Anyway, Lee was making these deliciously fresh watermelon margaritas (she showed me how she cut up chunks of watermelon, froze them, and then used them to make the fantastic frozen drinks), and I had like 3 of them (ok, maybe 4), and being the lightweight that I am, I fell asleep on her couch! She just let me sleep. And of course while I was awake she not only fed me margaritas but also great grilled food… I’ll always remember that party and her infectiously happy spirit. And that smile! Her passing is sooo sad!

    Bob Nelson
    I just want to say that the core group of us who knew Lee have been hit by this pretty hard, and I want us to take a step back and look at her life and all she accomplished, just by being who she was. She didn’t write any great American novel or get elected to anything, but we’re all torn up about her because she was such a great person. So let’s take her life as a lesson, to be generous and outgoing and bright-eyed as much as our brain chemistry allows us to be. And let’s recognize that Lee came into our lives and left them a little better, a little brighter, a little more Lee-like.
    In some Eastern and native American cultures, death is not an end point but a beginning, so people don’t mourn their dead but celebrate them. Whether or not you believe in a universal being or in a spirit life, Lee was a thoughtful, caring person, and she lives in our memories.
    To life, to Lee.

    Merryl Kafka
    Lee was the personification of innate intellectual brightness, beauty, strength and grace. As circumstances of life arose, Lee always responded quickly, demonstrating an incredible array of talents and abilities to help or enchant both friends or strangers — from changing a flat tire in 5 minutes for a group of pseudo-dykes in distress near Rubyfruit’s, to delighting partygoers with impromptu recitations of sensuous poetry, if gently encouraged. Lee’s heart was as grand as her smile and compassionate manner. Anyone whose life was touched by Lee will simply have to share her magic and magnetic personality with the rest of the world.  We can celebrate in knowing her.

    Ted Paszek
    I never rode with Lee Gorman. In the gift that her friendship was for the last eight years, we never once talked about cycling. What we did talk about was life, love, and our place here and in the universe. My heart skipped a happy beat whenever her name appeared on my Caller ID. It meant I would have a few happy moments of sharing with a kindred spirit. While her physical presence has left, she will always be alive in my heart and soul ’till I no longer walk this plane.

    Eric Lehman
    It was the annual Fast and Fab potluck several years back and people were talking about the 130-mile Ptown ride, an impossible feat for someone like myself who had never ridden more than 56 slow miles in a single day. I must have said this to someone within earshot of Lee Gorman, whom I had met on that 56-mile ride. She turned from the conversation she was having, looked me right in the eye and said, “Of course you can do it.” She hardly knew me–or perhaps she knew me better than I thought–but she said it with such matter-of-factness, with equal parts of challenge and encouragement, that signing up for the Ptown became a given.
    The next time I saw her we were both grinding up the Truro hill around mile 110 of the ride. “Look at you,” she said, and every inch of my exhausted body thrilled at having met not only her expectations of me but those of myself I didn’t even know I had.  I completed the ride for the fourth time this year, thinking of her when that hill came around.
    Thank you, Lee.

    John Chapman
    I first met Lee on a Croton Reservoir ride led by Richard Brause. It was a sunny, Sunday morning in October 2002. For years I had been living the life of a straight suburban husband and father, but had recently come out to my family and friends. I had also been out for a while in my 20s, but this ride was my first contact with the gay community in a very long time and I was really anxious—actually sweating. Was this going to be totally weird? Would they try to touch me? (I wish!) Would they reject me because I wasn’t gay enough? Should I try to go back in the closet?
    And then I saw Lee. She was sitting on the backrest of a park bench under a tree with her feet on the seat. She leaned forward, turned on that thousand-watt smile, stuck out her hand and said, “Hi, I’m Lee. What’s your name?” And from that moment on, I knew everything was going to be OK. Not just on the ride, but in my new life. Later that day, I watched a bike store owner in Hastings-on-Hudson insist that she not pay for the new tire he put on her bike, saying it was one he had lying around. This was my first experience of seeing how her magic affected other people.
    I pursued that friendship with a fierceness that surprised both of us. She didn’t quite get it at first. But over shared rides, meals, coffee, and daily phone calls, we soon became close. Early on she gave me a pendant with two floating rainbow-colored angels, one supporting the other as they clasp hands in space. She said, “This is us. I’ll always be there for you.” And she was. And in my heart, and in the hearts of a lot of other people, she always will be.

    David Roycroft
    It was my good fortune to meet Lee on the October Riverside Ride soon after I moved to New York in 2005. She brought witch’s hats with her (in Day-Glo chartreuse or orange and black) and stitched them to bicycle helmets with florist’s wire. My fondest memory of Lee will be of riding with her through the streets of Midtown that night. “Witches on Bikes!”  “Witches on Bikes!”
    Lee was caring and considerate. To less experienced cyclists she was a mentor, a teacher and a coach.  After helping me fix a flat tire once she looked at me and said, “OK, that’s the last flat tire this Lesbian’s going to fix for you. Next time you’re on your own.”
    Lee was vivacious and fun-loving, and she liked to keep things “stirred up.” After John Chapman helped me fix a flat tire on a ride to Oyster Bay on a 29-degree day last February, I told John to warm his hands by sticking them in his crotch. When he related the story to Lee, she told him he’d have warmed his hands better if, instead of his own crotch, he’d stuck them in mine.
    I didn’t see Lee often, but I always looked forward to a ride, a dinner or a celebration more if I knew Lee would be there. With her passing, we’re all diminished.
    Lee, in my memory your beautiful smile will always shine.

    Kim Anderson
    The one distinct fond memory I have of her, which is so vivid, I think of it every time I put on my bike helmet is from the Summer or 2002. I had just joined FastNFab and really started riding my bike again after years. Like a very protective “mother hen” and protector angel, she reminded me to always wear my helmet, make sure it fit “right” and to really get in the practice/ get in the habit of using the hand signals when biking, particularly on city streets. Today I can proudly say, I ride my bike safely without trepidation and confidently using my hand signals. THANK YOU LEE!!!

Let us celebrate her life proudly and remember, she may not be with us physically, but still is with us though we can’t see her. May her partner Kat be comforted knowing that Lee is always at her side. As for me, I will continue to wear my FastNFab jersey proudly wherever I bike in the US, but with an extra sense of pride know and honour because I have been very blessed to have met Lee.

    Mary O’Gorman
    I first met Lee at a bike ride upstate a few years ago when I was just starting to ride. She had done a 50-mile course and I had completed a 15-mile ride. We connected at the FnF meet-up afterwards. Her candor and friendliness were immediately evident and she was wonderful to meet. Her support for my accomplishment made me feel good and I was lifted by her interest and encouragement. She rode back to the City with me and we had a great chat about life histories and Brooklyn which was hometown for us both. We wondered about the similarities in our last names (mine is O’Gorman). Whenever I saw her at FnF events and other GLBT festivities, I was always happy to see her and felt that she was a friend. Lee was a lovely, giving, outgoing and energetic person and I am very sad at this bad news. I am struggling to understand how it’s possible that this generous, lively person is gone.

    Bob Nelson
    My defining memory of Lee Gorman was formed as we waited at the Bound Brook station of New Jersey Transit the afternoon of Memorial Day 2002.  Six of us had done the New Hope ride, and we were all too pooped to continue, so we had Geoff Green deliver two of us, along with our bags, to Manhattan and the rest of us waited for the train in Bound Brook. When the train came, the conductors were really snotty and said they could only take two cyclists because the bikes had to be stowed in a space for wheelchairs, and there were only two such spaces on the train. Lee and I had the others take the spots, and waited for the next train.  We had a couple of hours to kill, to talk about life and love and who we were. Lee told me about growing up Jewish with several brothers, and I related my efforts to deal with Catholicism.
    We made campy small talk about hunting for dates.  She told me that she’d had breast reduction surgery, and what a huge relief it was not to have men staring at her chest everywhere she went.  Although, she said, she wasn’t above using her feminine physique to get what she needed from men.
    The next train came, and this crowd of conductors was a lot more laid back than the last crowd.  I followed Lee into the train, and we loaded our bikes without trouble.  We hadn’t purchased tickets, but I was shocked when the conductor said, “Oh, that’s O.K., we’re going to comp your ticket.”  Comp my ticket?  Lee was mysterious about the event, but I can’t help thinking that a flash of female bosom helped grease our way onto the train.
    It wouldn’t be unlike Lee.  And that’s the memory that I want to have of her, laughing at men but using them when necessary.  Living for the moment, for her partner, Kat, for her bike and for us.

    Chris Bisceglie
    I remember meeting Lee Gorman several years ago when she led a FF group on the 5 Borough ride. I went with my friend.  There Lee stood on a corner with a large orange flag on her bike seat post. Lee  wanted to make sure we could all catch up to her at some point along the ride if we became separated. We snaked up the avenues ahead of the masses seeking a starting point off the FDR. Lee led the way until we reached the “gate”, an opening in the steel dividers of the highway. The group of about 15 riders waited behind her. She barked out directions for us as we stood there. Then she shouts “here they come!” Sure enough a huge man with the words “Marshall” on his chest was heading down the road with 40, 000 cyclists behind him. He towered over his bike –a massive presence riding at high speed.  Lee screams “now!”  And the marshal screams back pointing his finger at the queer riders huddling next to Lee  “Don’t even think about it!” Lee didn’t blink and we all scrambled into position to jump into the pack. It was a successful launch. What a thrill. We all laughed and followed our female leader  for 35 more miles as she blew on her whistle and stopped every now and then for a regroup.
    After that I invited Lee to come to CT and ride on my team for MS.  I was a team captain with 10 teenagers from the school I work at. Lee came with her special brother.  Lee obviously cared for him. I have a picture  on my desk. She is smiling wearing our school’s t shirt with our logo. Her arm is around the school principal. She kept teasing him and hamming it up with him. She just met these people only minutes earlier. The principal waved good bye to us as we rode away.  Lee took charge immediately and led my kids along the route. Lee asked them if they had enough water and she gave the kids tips along the way about techniques. She stayed with those kids the whole ride. The next day at work my boss, the principal  told me I had nice friends. 

Then next year, she rode again with my school. I have many photos of her in her Fast and Fab jersey alongside my teenagers. Those photos darned the school hallway for weeks.
    Another rider friend also met Lee on these three rides. She whispered to me on one of the rides “Isn’t she hot?  She is so dominant”. Yes she was but with a very loving side.
    If it were not for Lee I would not have found the courage to attempt a century ride. I rode along side her for several miles on one of the Boston to PTOWN rides. Finishing that ride was a proud moment for me. Having breakfast with Lee at the celebration was very cool. She said she was proud of me. That was Lee.  Thanks for memories Lee and may your family be comforted by your legacy.

    Eric Berend
    The bright light of Lee’s spirit and enthusiasm have passed on, and the world is a lesser place for it. But those of us who were fortunate enough to feel the reflection of her spirit, will always remember her well.

As my Native American cousins say, a person does not truly die, until the last person who also holds a meaningful memory of them, also passes away.

How many riders remember Lee’s incessantly spirited encouragement? Her irrepressible cheer? Her willingness to give of herself to others in the moment; whether it be encouraging a newcomer and helping them find a sense of acceptance amidst uncertainty, cheering on a breakway or chase group, cheering on even the stragglers? How many rank beginners, dropped in their first race, looked up at Cat’s Paw, wondering what they had got themselves into; and then took heart, hearing her whooping it up for them?

If I may suggest, it is appropriate for us to place a plaque or memorial marker somewhere near her favorite spot on Cat’s Paw Hill. It should not be difficult to organize an effort to gain approval from the Central Park Conservancy. I am sure that any expenses would be defrayed by willing contributions from Club members.

In the heat of competition, ego often trumps the simple joy of riding and racing, to the point where even ego-enjoyment is lost. Agitation sets in, conflicts arise, and people lose sight of the more important aspects. How easy is it to express joy without ego? Apparently not easy enough, for this world would truly be a better place if more people were like Lee.

    PAULETTE MEGGOE
    I met Lee one cold Saturday evening in February at Bob’s place. It was our annual Fast and Fab fest to launch our year of ”95 or ”96. I pulled Bob off to the side and quietly asked “who’s the blonde?”  His response:  “Oh!  That’s Lee Gorman.”
    Of course she had not noticed me as yet.  Eventually, I got close enough to have that wide-eyed, smiling face turn and say, “Hi!!  I’m Lee Gorman” and that was all it took. Buddies, friends and sistas we became for life.
    I’ve led many rides with her as my co-pilot and I’ve done soooo many more with her as riding buddies.  There were P’town rides with Lee too numerous to mention.  For the past five years, I would see her every Saturday morning at CRCA races in Central Park, where we both worked the marshal gig.  Her smile would be like the warmth of a sweltering summer day even when, in reality, it was a chilly spring  morning.
    I will always see her in her bright neon-yellow jacket and I’ll always feel her love. But most of all I shall never forget the sound of her voice, saying always in parting “big hugs and kisses!” to go along with the big hugs and kisses she gave.  I will always love you honey.